GallBladder Formula

GallBladder Formula has two primary areas of action, the digestive system and the hepatic system (particularly the gallbladder). The formula is a carminative, which means it helps to alleviate intestinal gas and bloating. It also acts as a cholagogue, meaning it increases bile production in the liver and bile secretion from the gallbladder. GallBladder formula also has an antispasmodic action, so it relaxes muscle cramps in the colon and gallbladder. This can help relieve pain from abdominal spasms and gallbladder attacks.

GallBladder Formula can be used for weak digestion, poor appetite, constipation, jaundice and bloating. By stimulating bile it aids digestion of fats and, taken with a fiber supplement, it can help reduce cholesterol levels. It can also be used as part of a gallbladder flush to reduce gallbladder congestion and help pass gallstones. This formula may also help to reduce fevers.

The following herbs are responsible for these effects:

Oregon grape root

This bitter herb stimulates the flow of bile from the liver and gallbladder. It contains berberine alkaloids (also found in goldenseal and barberry) which give it an antibacterial and antifungal action. It stimulates digestive secretions and helps with general detoxification by aiding lymphatic flow, especially in the gut. It has been chiefly used for gastritis and general digestive weakness. It also has a blood purifying action and has been used to treat skin conditions such as eczema, psoriasis and acne, all of which have links to poor liver and gallbladder function.

Ginger root

This herb is primarily used as a digestive aid. It stimulates blood flow in the abdominal region, improves digestive secretions, and relieves gas and flatulence. It soothes nausea and morning sickness, which are often related to the liver and gallbladder.

Cramp bark

As it name implies, this herb is used to relieve pain from cramps and spasms of the smooth muscles. As such, it has been used as a remedy for intestinal cramps, menstrual cramps and asthma.

Fennel seeds

In India and European countries, fennel is often handed out after dinner to settle the stomach and promote the digestion of fats. In other countries, fennel is used primarily as a weight control herb.  It is excellent as a remedy for colic in children, indigestion, nausea and vomiting.

Peppermint

The leaves of the peppermint plant have a carminative action, helping to improve digestion and relieve intestinal gas and bloating. Peppermint has also been used for colic and dyspepsia (indigestion). Tests on dogs have shown increased bile secretions. Peppermint oil has antimicrobial properties, so peppermint helps with intestinal infections. It also eases intestinal inflammation and relieves digestive related headaches.

Wild Yam Root

Wild yam root is both an antispasmodic and anti-inflammatory herb. It has a powerful effect on the digestive tract, easing digestive inflammation and cramping. This reduces pain in the intestinal region. It relaxes the bile ducts and promotes a better flow of bile. It also relieves the pain and bloating associated with adult colic. Historically, it has been used for conditions such as flatulence, hemorrhoids, colic, painful spleen, diarrhea, infected gallbladder, dysentery and liver disorders.

Catnip

This herb has been dubbed “Nature’s Alka Seltzer” by some herbalists. It helps ease acid indigestion, bloating, gas and stomach pain. It has a relaxing effect on the nerves in the digestive tract and stimulates a healthy flow of digestive secretions.

Suggested Use

Take 2 capsules 3 times daily with meals. If diarrhea ensues, discontinue for a day or two, then try again at 1/2 the former dose. For acute gallbladder attack, 2 capsules of the formula can be taken every two hours.

Selected References

Chinese Herbal Remedies by Albert Y. Leung (New York, New York: Universe Books, 1984).
A Handbook of Native American Herbs by Alma R. Hutchens (Boston, Massachusetts: Shambhala, 1992).
The Wild Rose Scientific Herbal by Terry Willard, Ph.D. (Calgary, Alberta: Wild Rose College of Natural Healing Ltd., 1991).